All posts by ciwfdenver

Meet the Filmmaker: Melanie McLean Brooks, “Big Hips, Big Dreams”

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
MMB: Being selected to participate in this festival feels like my welcome to Colorado. After transplanting to this magical state about a year ago, I am honored to call Colorado home and to be one of the featured filmmakers.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
MMB: I hope to see this festival continue to grow and strengthen as a platform for beautiful, powerful female voices across the state.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
MMB: In order to see our industry grow in Colorado, we have to lift up voices of women at the local level.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
MMB: This is an opportunity to support an meet your fellow local artists. Sounds like fun, no?

Q: This is the 9th year of CIWF. Do you have a favorite memory of the festival (or screening at The Bug Theatre) in years past?
MMB: I am a first timer.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
MMB: I am a fun-loving director/ director of photography who recently moved to this beautiful state with my husband (and business partner) and playful pup, Zoe. In recent years, most of my work has focused on stories of renewable energy, food culture or drag queens.

Big Hips, Big Dreams follows a woman during what seems like an ordinary day–through her daily routines, her thoughts on personal hygiene, love and a life-long pursuit to be comfortable in her own skin.

Q: Tell us one unique thing about you and/or your movies?
MMB: So far, I direct and shoot my documentaries. I find that keeping a tiny footprint allows me to be the least intrusive and therefore allowing me into more intimate spaces with my subjects. That is when the storytelling magic happens.

Q: What else are you working on?
MMB: I am working on a documentary called Eating the Enemy!

Chef Bun Lai has envisioned a new philosophy that offers edible solutions to a burdened food system. With population growth, over fishing, global warming and our ever-expanding carbon footprint, the food resources as we know them cannot keep pace. This film takes an intimate look at the innovative artist and follows along as he tries to inspire a food revolution.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
MMB: You can find my work on www.flyinggiantproductions.com.

Big Hips, Big Dreams will screen Saturday, May 11th at 1:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Sara Starr, “Last Call”

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
SS: I am absolutely honored! This festival is so meaningful for me as it was the first festival to screen my very first short film back in 2013. Although it has been a few years, I am thrilled to be coming back with a second project. This event is very important as it showcases the talent that we have in Denver and it helps to provide balance in the industry.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
SS: This event has already had a big impact on the local film community. I hope that it continues to grow its audience and be a source of inspiration for upcoming generations of female filmmakers.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
SS: I think it is crucial. As many of us who have worked in or studied the film industry know, the number of women working in behind-the-camera leadership roles is still painfully low. The latest Celluloid Report tells us that in the top 250 films in 2018, only 8% were directed by women. (I have linked the report here for anyone who wants to check it out). We may see a lot of celebration around women in film, but when we look at the cold hard facts, the numbers still aren’t great. Don’t get me wrong, I am not discounting the progress that has been made, I just know it’s important to look at the actual facts over what is being hyped in the media. The good news is, we do see more of a balance within the independent film world and this film festival is a reflection of that. Big changes can happen in small places. The more women we have working in Denver and the more opportunities for career growth and skill development we can provide, the more women we can send off ready to slay the larger markets.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
SS: This event is for everyone. We all benefit from watching films where women have had a leadership role in the creative process. It brings balance to the stories that influence our lives and it creates more opportunity to see realistic, powerful, and multi-dimensional female characters on screen

Q: This is the 9th year of CIWF. Do you have a favorite memory of the festival (or screening at The Bug Theatre) in years past?
SS: As I mentioned earlier, the Colorado Independent Women of Film Festival was one of the first to screen my original short film, The Journey Back. As a very nervous, new-to-the-scene filmmaker, CIWFF created an inviting and unintimidating experience. I will always appreciate that.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
SS: I wear a lot of hats in my life, as many of us do. I am a mother, teacher, actor, filmmaker, nature lover, and dog-mom. The short film that will be screened is a product of the CFVA Film Jam from last July. Film Jam is an awesome opportunity for filmmakers to work on projects and to sharpen their skills. It was an amazing experience and I was grateful to be able to connect with like-minded people. The film, Last Call, is a story that explores how two people can create two very different meanings from the same encounter at a bar.

Q: Tell us one unique thing about you and/or your movies?
SS: I live my life out of order. I will be an “empty nester” next year at the age of 36. I became a mother at the age of 18 and my experiences since then have greatly shaped who I am today. As far as my movies go, I am still tuning my cinematic voice, but what I do know for sure is that I want the films that I create to spark conversation, to be very human, to bring value to the lives of the audience.

Q: What else are you working on?
SS: I currently just signed with W-Talent as an actor. I love all parts of being a filmmaker, but I want to really dig into the craft of acting. I believe that by honing my skills as an actor, it will help me to become a better director. The actor/director relationship is so important, they need to understand each other.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
SS: I have recently started a new Instagram page where I will be posting all things related to my film and acting work. I would like to invite anyone who wants to watch my journey to follow me on IG @sara.starr.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
SS: I have so much appreciation for Colorado Independent Women of Film and I am truly honored to be a part of this year’s festival. I think the work that Eileen Agosta has done is incredible and this festival provides a guiding light for women who want to create in the cinematic world.

Last Call will screen Saturday, May 11th at 6:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Susan Lyles, “Eyes on the World”

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
SL: Very excited to be a part of celebrating women film makers.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
SL: Excited share our work and see the work of others.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
SL: Any time we can bring the work of women to the forefront it paves the way to true gender parity.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Anyone who enjoys film
SL: Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
Seeing the creative eye of film makers who are making movies they love is always the best.

Q: This is the 9th year of CIWF. Do you have a favorite memory of the festival (or screening at The Bug Theatre) in years past?
SL: This is our first festival so no memories yet, but can’t wait to make them this year.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
SL: I’ve been producing and directing work by women in the theatre for the last 14 years through And Toto too Theatre Company and have been producing/acting with Ruff, Ruff, Dog since 2015. Eyes on the World was part of the London 48 hour film project this past October, we shot on both sides of the pond and did one shot simultaneously in London and Denver using facetime on an ipad, and two cameras in Denver, and facetime on an ipad and shooting with an I-phone in London, so basically 5 camera’s at once.

Q: Tell us one unique thing about you and/or your movies?
SL: Our films have women in lead positions in writing, editing, producing and acting, with the female roles leading the stories.

Q: What else are you working on?
SL: Webseries The Adventures of Susy McPhail, which follows the adventures of a realtor in Denver, and several short films waiting to be scheduled for filming.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
SL: Find us on facebook https://www.facebook.com/Ruff-Ruff-Dog-Films-321158691987930/

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
SL: Thanks for creating a space for women creatives and inviting us to that space!

Eyes on the World will screen Saturday, May 11th at 1:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Nikie Perlmutter, “Rations:

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
NK: I feel honored and proud. It’s humbling to have it recognized by other independent filmmakers.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
NK: I’m looking forward to interacting with my peers and seeing their work. I’m always inspired and in awe of what other filmmakers create. Women especially are painted with a broad brush and it’s exciting to see more and more stories created by women that showcase how very complex and unique each of us truly are.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
NK: Incredibly important! Women have an uncanny knack for seeking each other out for shared experiences, to lift each other up, and work together for a collective goal. Not to say that women aren’t flawed, but any and every woman-led set I’ve worked on has always been a unique experience. I believe it’s important and necessary that female-identifying filmmakers see themselves reflected in their media and are given platforms to speak their truths and collaborate.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival?  Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
NK: Festivals are always fun for filmmakers to meet each other and celebrate our successes. Non-filmmakers get the opportunity to see films before a theatrical release and also appreciate the footwork, labor, and love that goes into this craft. It’s funny how we spend so much time consuming media yet we don’t get the chance to consider the people behind the movies and shows we all love. The closest a lot of movie-goers get to the people “behind the scenes” is at huge fan events. Attending a film festival is like going to a restaurant and then getting to speak with the chef directly about their craft. These interactions offered at film festivals create a stronger bond between the filmmaker and the film viewer.

Q: This is the 9th year of CIWF. Do you have a favorite memory of the festival (or screening at The Bug Theatre) in years past?
NK: This will actually be my first time in attendance! It certainly won’t be my last.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
NK: Rations was the movie that did not want to get made. Set to a shooting schedule in spring here in Denver, there was an earlier production of Rations. We were so close to having a very different version in the can until we had our last day of shooting devoted to outdoor scenes. Denver being Denver, it rained every single day I attempted to schedule our shoot – which is both an inconvenience to production as well as disastrous for a movie about a drought. Ultimately, enough of the old crew had to move on while I attempted to reschedule. The real blow was when my original DP moved out of state. I attempted to convince our gaffer to take over as DP. He told me, very politely and very kindly, “No.” Too much time had gone by and there were too many stylistic differences, it would not have done our film any justice for Aaron to take over when there was still so much left to shoot. And so back to the drawing board… A year later, with a new crew, new director Alex RW, several new drafts of the script, and my kind gaffer at the helm as DP, the Rations you see here was shot. Ironically enough, it snowed the morning we had our exterior shots. Luckily it melted away in time to roll. Rations is an example of perseverance of both a story as well as Colorado independent filmmakers. If a story must be told, it will be told, and sometimes a No is the best favor someone can give you.

Q: Tell us one unique thing about you and/or your movies?
NK: I’m drawn to character, first and foremost. I’m most proud of the and moral-grey area of Rations and I hope my future projects continue to encapsulate that tension. 

Q: What else are you working on?
NK: I’m always writing but I currently take on positions on set as art director here in Denver. Last year I worked as production designer on Riley Anne Martin’s The Idea of Black and White, which follows a young photographer as she battles with her art, love, lust, and her own uncertainty. 

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
NK: Follow our Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/rationsmovie/ and https://www.facebook.com/ARWorksFilm/ for news on other ARWorks productions.

Rations will screen Saturday, May 11th at 1:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Rebekah Fieschi, “Sylphvania Grove”

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film
RF: I’m very excited to be a part of Colorado Independent Women of Film and cannot wait to discover the entire selection at the Bug Theater.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
RF: I hope to meet like minded filmmakers and an indie hungry audience for whom our films are made for.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
RF: I find it very important to focus on regional women filmmakers as it is harder for us to be seen and heard, especially in smaller filmmaking communities that often appear at first sight to be over run by men. It’s a great reminder that women are here, doing great work and it’s a great way to put women in touch with one another so we can lift up and support each other’s works and create more visibility and opportunities for all of us.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
RF: Anyone who loves film should attend the festival! I make movies for the audience and love to interact with them after screenings. Indie festivals are a great opportunity to see unique movies, meet the filmmakers behind films that you like and discover stories that may not have been told through mainstream media.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
RF: I’m an award-winning writer/director from Corsica. My focus is to bring more entertaining, yet layered, character driven gothic horror and fantasy films to the screen while giving a voice to underrepresented characters. With my production company, Horromance Productions, I strive to make low budget films that look like big budget movies while keeping the ecological impact of filmmaking in mind for each production therefor making as many eco-conscious and cruelty-free choices as possible. Sylphvania Grove follows the adventure of a quiet ten-year-old girl struggling to find her place in the world who follows a magical being in the woods where she must find her strength while remaining true to herself .
The short doubled it’s asking amount while crowdfunding in April 2017, it premiered in festivals in September 2018 and has won four awards since then including Best Fantasy and Best Director.

Q: Tell us one unique thing about you and/or your movies?
RF: I use fantastic mediums to tell very real stories, allowing the audience to connect strongly with my lead characters and diving into their world.

Q: What else are you working on?
RF: I’m currently in pre-production for a short film The Unvisited, a spooky comedy about a very old couple living alone in an isolated mansion, which is set to be shot in June. I’m also developing my first feature film which is a more sinister project entitled Beast, a psychological drama/creature feature that deals with trauma, mental health and perseverance (we’re currently looking for producers and funding, reach out if you want to be a part of the adventure!).

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
RF: You can follow my work through my company’s website www.horromance.com where you can sign up to our mailing list. We’re also on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @horromance. Sylphvania Grove has it’s own Facebook and Instagram @SylphvaniaGrove . My previous short film Mauvaises Têtes is streaming on Seed&Spark and Amazon Prime Video (https://www.seedandspark.com/watch/mauvaises-tetes , https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07KHXXSGT ).

Sylphvania Grove will screen Saturday, May 11th at 3:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmakers: Jessica McGaugh and Roma Sur, “Three Worlds, One Stage”

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
J&R: We are very excited to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film. We love the mission of the festival how it supports female Colorado filmmakers in a real way.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
J&R: We know the event will give us a venue to promote our own mission of bridging cultures. We also hope to meet other filmmakers in the area since we are always looking for ways to support the work of other artists and also find collaborators in the area.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
J&R: It is very important to focus on regional women filmmakers because it highlights the fact that there are many women in Colorado making work.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
J&R: Three Worlds, One Stage demonstrates the positive power of multiculturalism through the lens of dance and music. It is a story of immigration, determination and hope – an American narrative at its core. As a filmmaking team, we have been working together since 2011 when we shot our first feature doc The Golden Hour in the streets of Delhi. Since then we have worked on three features, a webseries and a number of shorts together.

Q: Tell us one unique thing about you and/or your movies?
J&R: The unique angle of our films is how we tell stories through many cultural lenses. In our documentary Three Worlds, One Stage, for example, we are telling the story of dance through the eyes of five different cultures including the filmmakers.

Q: What else are you working on?
J&R: Currently we are in development of a narrative feature written by Roma. Lots more information on that coming soon!

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
J&R: Check out our Facebook page for Three Worlds, One Stage to follow our journey and find out more about upcoming screenings. https://www.facebook.com/threeworldsonestage

Three Worlds, One Stage will screen Saturday, May 11th at 3:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Marin Lepore, “I Put the Bi in Bitter – Season One”

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
ML: I’m so grateful to be part of an event that celebrates female-filmmakers! I’m a strong believer that accurate representation starts behind the scenes, so it’s important to celebrate films that not only have female casts, but female writers, directors, and crews as well.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
ML: I hope that everyone who attends this event sees not only the power of women in film, but also the diversity of women in film. Even though we’re all women, everyone is so different and unique, spreading across all genres and subjects, and I know the films will reflect that.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
ML: SO important! Female-creators within any industry, but especially the film industry, are incredibly underrepresented, so it’s essential that communities work together to lift up and highlight the stories and voices that are seldom given the spotlight.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival?  Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
ML: Everyone who is interested in film, regardless of experience, should attend! Denver has some amazing unknown filmmakers, and festivals are a great way to not only see the independent work that’s out there, but also to support our own creative community, and meet new like-minded people you may be able to collaborate with in the future.

Q: This is the 9th year of CIWF. Do you have a favorite memory of the festival (or screening at The Bug Theatre) in years past?
ML: I’ve been attending EFP events for a couple years now, and I had my first ever screening in February 2019! It’s so surreal and validating to see your work projected on a large screen in front of a live audience, and it’s also a great environment to be around other filmmakers and film-enthusiasts.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
ML: I’m a comedy screenwriter who aspires to work on TV shows for kids and teens, and I’m co-creator of Sad Girl Productions, a Denver-based film production company that creates diverse, inclusive, female-centric films; one of them being I Put the Bi in Bitter which will be screening! I Put the Bi in Bitter is a cute and lighthearted comedy webseries about a bisexual teenager and her lesbian BFF as they navigate high school, deal with friendship/crushes, and all the other shenanigans that come from being young. If you can’t make the screening, you can watch the series for free on youtube: youtube.com/sadgirlproductions

Q: Tell us one unique thing about you and/or your movies?
ML: As a gay woman of color, I strive to represent minorities in my writing, and my stories often highlight LGBT and POC communities. I’m also very passionate about kid-friendly writing. I think a huge thing LGBT media is missing right now is being accessible to a younger audience, so I love to create non-dramatic, non-tragic, non-sexual stories that normalize being gay, especially while being young. Basically, like many other people, we create the content we wish we had growing up.

Q: What else are you working on?
ML: My team and I are currently in pre-production for I Put the Bi in Bitter Season 3, which we plan to shoot in June and have released on youtube later this year!

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
ML:
Websitesadgirlproductions.com
Instagraminstagram.com/sadgirlprods
Youtubeyoutube.com/SadGirlProductions
Emailsadgirlprods@gmail.com(I absolutely love talking to new people, so please feel free to reach out about anything! Whether that’s looking to collaborate, talking about a project I’ve done, sending over an interesting article, or just saying hi!)

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
ML: Thank you for supporting women in film, and I’m very excited to see this organization grow even bigger in the coming years!

I Put the Bi in Bitter – Season One will screen Saturday, May 11th at 3:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Sheila E. Schroeder, “Scary Lucy”

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
SS: It is a distinct honor to be able to screen Scary Lucy at CIWF! Our short was filmed at various sites in Denver with an all-Colorado cast and crew. Having a chance to screen at our home town festival at the iconic Bug theater is a great chance for our fans and a new audience to see this film on the big screen. Given the themes within the film that speak to women’s health, resistance and persistence, CIWF is a great fit.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
SS: We hope to gain exposure for our cast and crew through this screening in addition to providing your audiences with a 21-minute escape. We like to say this is a comedy with heart so we hope the audience walks away feeling better about themselves after having spent time with Scary Lucy.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
SS: CIWF’s focus on regional women filmmakers is exactly what the industry needs. This focus helps to add ballast to an industry that is out of balance when it comes to opportunities for women. This festival showcases the talents of a wide swath of women who have plenty to say and whose talents need outlets.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
SS: Having attended the festival on several occasions, I know there’s something for everyone. If you appreciate good storytelling you’ll want to purchase a pass and drop in for the whole event!

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
SS: I wrote, produced and edited Scary Lucy as part of Project DU F.I.L.M., (film initiative linking mentors) a filmmaking mentorship at the University of Denver designed to change the face of film in front of and behind the camera. We have amazing alumni mentors working shoulder to shoulder with our students who are learning how to be film professionals. Scary Lucy has been fortunate to receive awards for the screenplay and has screened in front of audiences from Melbourne, Australia to Salt Lake City.
As a college professor for the last 21 years at the University of Denver, my filmmaking has focused on social change, especially as it relates to issues impacting women, girls and the LGBT communities.

Q: Tell us one unique thing about you and/or your movies?
SS: Our film stars two of Denver’s best stand up comics, Christie Buchele and Janae Burris. Without these two talented women, the amazing Marteene Diaz directing, the tenacious work of Associate Producer, Oanh Le, and the brilliance of our production designer, Angela Forster, this film would not be half of what it turned out to be.

Q: What else are you working on?
SS: I am putting the final touches on a short screenplay called, Hunting Season. It’s a story about a lesbian Latinx comic who finds herself in the crosshairs during hunting season in Wyoming. The goal is to film this in December, 2019 as our third Project DU F.I.L.M. short.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
SS: http://scarylucythemovie.com/ https://www.facebook.com/scarylucythemovie/

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
SS: Hurray for CIWF and all you do to help level the playing field for female filmmakers in Colorado!

Scary Lucy will screen Saturday, May 11th at 6:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Lindsay Morrison, “Reliquary: A Mugging”

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
LM: I am thrilled to be selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film. I am looking forward to meeting more women in the Colorado film community, and to see what kind of awesomeness these women have been serving up lately. And I’m very honored to be counted amongst them.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
LM: I hope to meet a lot of kick-ass women, watch some great films, and to leave with an increased sense of community. I’m new to the Colorado film community and this will be a great opportunity to introduce myself to more people, find potential collaborators, and maybe make some new friends.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
LM: I think it’s incredibly important. As a Los Angeles ex-pat, I’m a huge proponent of the decentralization of Hollywood and I’d love to see the Denver film seen grow more and more. And I think there’s an ever-present need more female voices, and other marginalized voices, to take over more of the industry in general. Film is a medium that can move people to change their minds or take action or to heal themselves. And so it’s critical that a medium with so much power should be emerging from more than just one gender and one location (i.e. Men in LA)

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
LM: Even before I was a filmmaker I always loved going to film festivals because of the variety of films. There is so much creativity, thought, vision, I think it can inspire anyone, whether or not they are a filmmaker. If you like going out to see a movie, seems like you might like going to watch a shorts block as well. It’s entertainment and a chance to “fill the well” so to speak.

Q: This is the 9th year of CIWF. Do you have a favorite memory of the festival (or screening at The Bug Theatre) in years past?
LM: Since I am new to the area, I haven’t had a ton of experiences at the Bug yet, but I’ve loved it every time I’ve gone. I’ve screened at the Bug twice — once at EFP and the other at Open Screen Night, and both were a blast. I think my favorite was attending Open Screen Night, because of the crazy, weird energy of it all. It was so fun to see everyone’s strange movies screened properly. I wish Open Screen Night would come back!! But I also just generally love the staff at the Bug, the people who keep it going and curate such a lovely selection of oddities every month.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
LM: I’m a writer/diretor with a passion for horror and deep love of all things beautifully bizarre. I have 10+ years experience working on the LA Film Scene, both on and off set, but jumped ship last year in order to move to Denver with my husband and start an independent film production company. We officially launched WOLF LUV FILMS last September and have been working to build it up every day.

Reliquary: A Mugging is the first episode in a series entitled Reliquary. My partner, Michael La Breche, developed the series with R.J. Holloway, and wrote many of the episodes. I was so excited when they invited me to direct the first installment. I love this piece because of how it plays with expectations vs. reality, who is good vs. evil, and what that even means. The supposed victim becomes the aggressor because of her inner evil nature which is awakened by the Reliquary; meanwhile the petty thief, who makes a wrong choice in a moment of desperation, is in fact too good at heart to even be able to hold the Reliquary for more than a moment.

Neon pink became a major theme for this film, in part because I love neon and try to incorporate it wherever possible, but it made a lot of sense here because of the effect light has on the feel of a scene. I wanted there to be a transition between the “real” world and the world of cosmic terrors and old ones returning, and having an actual neon sign in the scene allowed there to be a practical light that becomes more and more expressionistic and surreal as we move toward the climax.

Q: Tell us one unique thing about you and/or your movies?
LM: I love to make vocal cameos in all my films, and Reliquary is no different. In this I play the voice of the fed-up sister giving her brother a hard time over the phone. It’s something that started happening just out of necessity, but I have to admit I sort of love having that little piece of myself written into the films DNA. And it makes me giggle just a little every time I watch it.

Q: What else are you working on?
LM: Right now I’m gearing up the direct episode 2 of the Reliquary series. The next one revolves around a priest and I’m pretty excited about that. But I’m also working on my first feature film, which will also be WOLF LUV FILM’s first feature production. It’s called LATEX” and is a horror film with a very cool villain that I don’t want to let out of the bag quite yet, but I will say she is a very disturbed woman with some very specific tastes. I wrote it and am set to direct it as well.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
LM: I have a personal website here: www.lindsaymorrison.com, and you can check out my production company WOLF LUV FILMS, here: www.wolfluvfilms.com.

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
LM: I think it’s so cool that you gals exist and I can’t wait to get to know all of you better. Thanks for creating a space to elevate and promote Colorado Independent Woman Filmmakers!

Reliquary: A Mugging will screen Saturday, May 11th at 1:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Alison Piper, “Elsie Goes Walking”

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
AP: I feel incredibly honored to have been selected.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
AP: I am excited to meet other women filmmakers from our rich community and see other interesting films.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
AP: Incredibly important. There is so much talent and unique voices that it’s important to give women filmmakers here an opportunity to showcase their work.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
AP: Anyone interested in film should attend!

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
AP: This project was collaboration of so many talented cast and crew members. It really hit home my love of working on independent films.

Q: What else are you working on?
AP: I am currently finishing a new short film Trace shot on super 16MM. We are in post production now. We’re excited to be able to show it out in the world soon.

Q: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
AP: I am not currently on social media right now in any capacity. We do have a page for Trace if you want to learn more about it.
https://www.seedandspark.com/fund/trace#updates

Q: Is there anything else you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
AP: This is a great organization and so important to support women filmmakers especially in a smaller market like Colorado. Again the work that comes out of the artistic community here astounds me. It’s great to have a venue to see these films.

Elsie Goes Walking will screen Saturday, May 11th at 1:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.