June 2016

Meet the Filmmaker: Catrin Blythe, “Pin the Tail on the Donkey”

Catrin_Blythe_HeadshotQ: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
CB: I feel honored and thrilled to be able to show my film in this festival.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
CB: To show my hard work to other women independent filmmakers, gain confidence, and see other films.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
CB: I think that women don’t get much recognition for the films that they make. With the event women filmmakers can present films and meet other women filmmakers.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
CB: I think everyone should come because they can see entertaining films and support the local women filmmakers.

Q: This is the 6th year of CIWF. What’s been the best part/a favorite memory of the festival in years past?
CB: My favorite memory was last year’s film festival. It was my first film festival and I enjoyed meeting other filmmakers and presenting my own. It gave me confidence and pride to be there.

Q: We hold CIWF at The Bug Theatre. Why is The Bug a great home for this event?
CB: I think it’s a good place to host the event because it’s a theater and it gives the film festival a sort of style, like a movie theater.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
CB: I live in Austin, Texas and I’m fifteen years old. The film I made is about a friend who makes a childish party for her best friend.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
CB: I think this is a great event for any female film maker to present your films and a great place for anyone to come see some local films.

Pin the Tail on the Donkey will screen Saturday, June 4th at 8:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Elizabeth Giorgi, “Victoriana”

liz4-bwQ: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
EG: It’s a great honor and I’m really looking forward to sharing Victoriana. Colorado is a brilliant place to set a film, not just because of the natural beauty, but because of the talent. I’m excited to highlight that.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
EG: I honestly hope to meet more people in Colorado who are excited about the women who are creating and telling stories in this community.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
EG: It’s an incredibly long and difficult journey to make a film. And honestly, one of the best motivators for completing a project is knowing that there are going to be opportunities to show your work and talk about it. Most women in creative work that I know are looking for opportunities to grow, but those opportunities are so few and far between that it can be easy to feel isolated or worse, quit. This event will hopefully ensure that more women continue to pursue their passion projects and continue to improve their professional skills.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
EG: There is such a movement right now to bring more attention to talented women in entertainment and if you’re the kind of person that just wants to see more diverse storytelling, events like these are a perfect way to expand your options and see something you may not have seen anywhere else.

Q: We hold CIWF at The Bug Theatre. Why is The Bug a great home for this event?
EG: The Bug is historic and just an incredible spot. Can’t think of anything better!

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
EG: Elizabeth Giorgi is a writer and filmmaker as well as the founder and CEO of Mighteor, an internet video production company. She is an Emmy-Award winning director with credits with PBS, Discovery Channel and Big Ten Network.
Victoriana is an experimental narrative short that begins at the end of a relationship. It asks the question: when two people are no longer communicating, is it braver to stay and stay silent or walk away?

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
EG: It’s an incredibly important event and one that you absolutely shouldn’t miss.

Victoriana will screen Saturday, June 4th at 8:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Shawna Schultz, “No Soliciting”

No SolicitingQ: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
SS: I’m quite honored to have my work selected to be screened at the Colorado Independent Women of Film event.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
SS: I’m hoping that people enjoy seeing films from local talent.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
SS: I think it’s important to give a platform for regional women filmmakers to show their work and be celebrated.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
SS: I haven’t been yet, so I’m not sure the exact audience, but many people who have never attended a film festival don’t really understand it. Shorts blocks especially are a fun way to get a taste for multiple stories from different perspectives in small doses. There aren’t many places to see shorts, so events like this makes it fun to gain many experiences in a short amount of time.

Q: This is the 6th year of CIWF. What’s been the best part/a favorite memory of the festival in years past?
SS: I haven’t attended past years. I just heard of it this year through Film Fatales.

Q: We hold CIWF at The Bug Theatre. Why is The Bug a great home for this event?
SS: I haven’t yet been to The Bug theatre, but I look forward to it!

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
SS: I’m the co-founder of Mass FX Media, a Colorado-based video production company that specializes in motion graphics, visual effects and cinematography. We serve all kinds of clients from non-profits, to documentary filmmakers to corporations, and sometimes we just need to make something for ourselves. We had a funny run-in with a solicitor at our office, and we thought that it would be funny if someone pranked solicitors, so we came up with an idea for a fake hidden camera show in which we staged a prank using improv actors. We had one free day, so we hired improv actors over the weekend, then shot and edited the entire piece in one day. It was a whirlwind, but it quenched or desire to do something silly.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
SS: I’m so excited to be a part of the screenings for CIWF! Independent film is such a fun thing to be a part of, and I’m looking forward to meeting other females in the industry around the area. We’re a minority in this industry, so it’s great to support one another.

No Soliciting will screen Friday, June 3rd at 7:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Alison Smith, “3 Chords”

AlisonSmithHeadshot3 Chords | www.ARSmakeup.com

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
AS: I’m very excited to participate in this year’s festival. I love being a team player and being a part of bringing other peoples visions to life, but it feels good to focus on my own projects too and the things that got me excited about filmmaking to begin with.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
AS: I’m interested in connecting with other women in this business and seeing how they are involved in filmmaking in Colorado. I want to see what they are passionate about and how they tell their stories.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
AS: I think it is important to focus on regional women filmmakers because we’re still a minority. I believe all local art needs to be promoted, but it’s especially important to put as much energy and momentum as we can behind women who have a point of view and want to use their voice in visual arts and storytelling. By doing so, we can help cultivate a culture where others are encouraged to believe they can do this too.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
AS: Anyone who is inspired by the creative process and who enjoys visual storytelling should attend.

Q: This is the 6th year of CIWF. What’s been the best part/a favorite memory of the festival in years past?
AS: First time attendee!

Q: We hold CIWF at The Bug Theatre. Why is The Bug a great home for this event?
AS: I have never attended this theatre, but I have heard a lot of good things about it and the lengths it goes to in order to sustain and nurture the local film and arts environment.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
AS: I am a production makeup artist from Colorado Springs, but I started out in this field as a video editor and produced my own documentaries. I’ve always loved music videos and wanted to film and edit something a little more on the creative side. This project came to life because of that desire.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
AS: I wish I would have been paying more attention and found this organization sooner.

3 Chords will screen Friday, June 3rd at 7:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmakers: Jessica McGaugh and Stacy Barton, “Red Pearl:

The Filmmakers: Jessica McGaugh (left) and Stacy Barton (right).

The Filmmakers: Jessica McGaugh (left) and Stacy Barton (right).

Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?

J&S: We are very excited to have the opportunity to share our film with the independent film community and the patrons of the Bug Theater. The regular programming at the Bug is a true celebration of local film, theatre and art. We love being part of it.
Q: What are your hopes for the event?
J&S: As filmmakers, we are most excited to share our work with a new audience. We hope that the CIWF crowd will enjoy the film just as much as we enjoyed making it.
Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
J&S:
We (Jess McGaugh and Stacy Barton) have been friends since 2005 when we became roommates while attending grad school at Syracuse University in New York. The snowy winters allowed for an immersion into filmmaking, and it was only a matter of time before we would venture into the world of narrative features.We began writing Red Pearl, deeply inspired by the city and mountains surrounding us from our 8th floor, shared downtown Denver office at CU Denver where we taught together for 5 years.  Now, we each hold Assistant Professor positions teaching film and video production, Jessica still at CU Denver and Stacy at the University of West Georgia.
As adventurers ourselves, we closely identify with our lead character Scarlet who is exploring the difficulties of following big dreams. Each of us have picked up and moved to brand new cities multiple times throughout our lives in search of our individual paths to success. The overwhelming process of immersing oneself into an unfamiliar environment with no friends or family to fall back on is a life-forming experience, and we wanted to visualize the struggle of a young woman on her quest of learning who she is and what she is capable of in a difficult environment.
An interesting production note: Stacy and Jess were both pregnant during the shooting of this movie. Stacy was 8 months and Jess was 2 months. Both babies were born during post-production of the movie.

Meet the Filmmaker: Mallory Littleton, “The Magic Word”

The Magic WordQ: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
ML: I’m really excited! The CIWF does really important things for women trying to make their way in the industry and I’m honored to be included.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
ML: I know I’ll be able to see some really great films from other local women, that one’s a given. I’m hoping to be able to meet and talk with some other filmmakers, and I definitely hope that everyone likes my short!

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
ML: Colorado has a nice little industry cropping up and the rest of the country is starting to take notice. The film industry is notorious for being male dominated, so if women make a point of not being silent and really going after what they want here, it could be the beginning of widespread change.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
ML: Anyone who enjoys independent films should attend. And not specifically feminists, either. The whole point is to show that women make films on the same level as men. If someone wants to experience new stories told from new perspectives, this is the place to be.

Q: This is the 6th year of CIWF. What's been the best part/a favorite memory of the festival in years past?
ML: This will be my first year attending!

Q: We hold CIWF at The Bug Theatre. Why is The Bug a great home for this event?
ML: The Bug is a pillar for the local entertainment scene. They open their theater up to genuinely new and unique content every single day. Having it anywhere else would seem wrong.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
ML: I was born and raised here in Colorado. I’ve been told that as I was growing up, I was always talking and telling stories. I was always writing “books.” In middle school, I took to photography. And in high school, I began doing theater. As the question of “what do you want to be when you grow up” transformed from a meandering hypothetical to a very real decision, I realized that film was the only way to combine all the different things I love.

The Magic Word was written and produced as my final project for my production 1 class over at the Colorado Film School. I’ve always loved the idea of magic existing in the world we know, but in very subtle ways, and this film is an example of that.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
ML: CIWF is doing amazing things in the local film community and I can’t wait to see what their future holds!

The Magic Word will screen Friday, June 3rd at 7:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Jennifer Ashcom, “Die Letzte Blume (The Last Flower)”

jenn default stuttgart viewQ: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
JA: Absolutely ecstatic. Having just moved here from the East Coast to shift gears and focus on film, I stumbled upon The Bug Theater EFP film night a few weeks ago, and was encouraged to submit even though the deadline had passed, so I feel tremendously blessed. As my premiere screening, my first attempt, this is a monumental milestone for me, and the support from new friends and fellow filmmakers has been incredible! Thank you!

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
JA: Ideally this event will encourage others to put their work out there, to network and continue cultivating creative community. Historically, I’ve written/filmed/edited/colour corrected on my own, however I’d like to meet some badass female filmmakers, and manifest sweet collaborations for the future. You can definitely start out on your own – all you need is a camera, your vision, and a commitment to diligence and seeing your projects through to fruition – but there is definite strength in numbers, and connecting with women who vibe along similar wavelengths in vital! I’m eager to learn.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
JA: Immensely so. It is a demographic that needs to be brought to light and nurtured.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
JA: I truly think everyone would enjoy attending the festival. It’s not just about celebrating women, but supporting the independent film scene in general. Anyone passionate about film or looking to add substance to their day should attend. Often, we are caught in complacent routine and may forget to add depth with eye-opening documentaries or colourful whimsy with fiction. We owe it to ourselves to add more imagination and beauty (even when it may be heart-wrenching) to our lives.

Q: This is the 6th year of CIWF. What’s been the best part/a favorite memory of the festival in years past?
JA: This is my premiere festival! Hopefully the first of many to come..

Q: We hold CIWF at The Bug Theatre. Why is The Bug a great home for this event?
JA: Though I’ve only been here for a handful of weeks, The Bug immediately felt like home. I felt part of the family from the moment I walked in, and adore that people introduce themselves and take time to offer their support. We are encouraged to network. This is so important for artists! Independently we can create a great deal, certainly, but being assimilated into a crew, or even just finding another person and becoming a dynamic duo helps us grow. Being able to pick each others’ brains and spitball ideas allows us evolve exponentially!

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
JA: I’m a 27yr old lesbian filmmaker from Maryland (close to DC). Casa del Raptor Productions is my budding company. I’m amateur hour; never studied film but am compulsive with my camera. Die Letzte Blume was a product of visiting a former flame, having visions creep into my head in the dead of night, and being blessed Uli (who isn’t an actress but a teacher in Stuttgart) has always been down to participate in my projects. So, this is admittedly more of a teaser that evolved/digressed so much from its initial storyline during editing. A painful amount was cut because I wanted to keep only the most cinematic of shots – I was literally unboxing my Canon 6D on the plane to Germany and figuring it out on the fly — but I’m working on developing the full screenplay so maybe next year I’ll have my first feature film, with a happier ending because #lesbiansdeservebetter.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
JA: Grateful the initiative was taken to create such an event. It’s stellar to be surrounded by women with strong voices and clear visions who are passionate about their projects. Sharing the same space is super rad! Thank you for the profound platform.

Die Letzte Blume (The Last Flower) will screen Saturday, June 4th at 8:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Diane Bell, “Obselidia”

George and Sophi Final 01Q: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
DB: Having just recently moved here, it’s an absolute honor.  I am thrilled to now be considered a Colorado Independent Woman of Film.
Q: What are your hopes for the event?
DB: I’m hoping to connect with other local filmmakers.  I feel so strongly that filmmaking is about community and as someone new to the region, I’m excited to meet people here who have similar values and goals.
Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
DB: Super important – both the regional and the woman parts, as both are typically under-represented in the mainstream and need all the exposure and support they can get.
Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival?  Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
DB: Any quality independent film festival is not just for filmmakers, it’s also a chance for regular audience members to get to see films that are not easy to find.  And these films often have a lot more soul than the ones you’ll find in your local multiplex.
Q: This is the 6th year of CIWF. What’s been the best part/a favorite memory of the festival in years past?
DB: This is my first one, looking forward to creating wonderful memories.
 Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
DB: The film I’m sharing, Obselidia, was my first feature film, and one that is very dear to my heart.  When I made it, my intentions were so pure.  I never thought anyone anywhere would see it, and I just made a film full of things and people I love.  It’s about a man writing an encyclopedia of obsolete things and the journey he makes with a silent film projectionist to Death Valley.  A meditation on loss, climate change, and the rampant rate of obsolescence and extinction, it’s a very unique, gentle film.  Since then, I’ve made two more features, but this one will always have the most special place in my heart.
Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
DB: Just: thank you.

Meet the Filmmaker: Nancy Fingerhood, “Mile High Nancy Episode 2: The Talk”

Nancy headshotQ: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
NF: I am always honored to be selected in the festival.  I am happy to be recognized by the Co community.
Q: What are your hopes for the event?
NF: I just hope people enjoy the films and appreciate the work put into making them.
Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
NF: I like the opportunity it provides to focus on topics women want to make films about.
Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival?  Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
NF: I think anyone who likes watching videos and wants to support local artists.
Q: This is the 6th year of CIWF. What’s been the best part/a favorite memory of the festival in years past?
NF: Answering questions about films and hearing what other filmmakers have to say.
Q: We hold CIWF at The Bug Theatre. Why is The Bug a great home for this event?
NF: I’ve done stand up and shown films at the Bug. I love the Bug b/c it supports the arts and allows us to express ourselves.
Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
NF: This is based on my alter ego, Mile High Nancy. A single mother who is an aspiring comedian and host of a 420 friendly cooking show. This is the second episode of the web series and focuses on Nancy and her friends having girl talk.
Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
NF: Thank you for allowing me to screen my web episode.
Mile High Nancy Episode 2: The Talk will screen Friday, June 3rd at 7:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.

Meet the Filmmaker: Erin Kelly, “The Old Man”

unspecifiedQ: How do you feel about being selected to participate in Colorado Independent Women of Film?
EK: I am excited to be screening The Old Man in Colorado Women of Film. It feels rewarding and gratifying to be able to showcase work locally so that the cast and crew can have an opportunity to celebrate the work.

Q: What are your hopes for the event?
EK: I aim to have fun and celebrate with the rockstar crew that worked on the film. I hope to connect with other filmmakers. I also hope to connect with people and organizations who have experienced or are working with the topic of my film. Which I won’t tell you, you should just come see it. If I tell you what it is about it will spoil it. Just come.

Q: How important is it to focus on regional women filmmakers?
EK: This is a bit of a double edged sword for me. As a women filmmaker, I am thrilled to be on the front lines of this gender shift. Men have dominated the industry since the beginning of it and I believe its about damn time to shine the spotlight on the talent of women. However I fear that we are jumping too far the other direction and not actually seeing a victory over sexism. We are experiencing the same paradigm shift in the acting world, in the industries movement to normalize/diversify the field they have gone too far in the other direction, there are too few to no roles for white people any more. On the one hand, like with women flowing into the industry, its about damn time, white people have been dominating acting roles, it is time to share the wealth, normalize, but eliminating the other side isn’t the answer either.

Q: Who would enjoy attending the festival? Is it just for the filmmaking community, or is there a reason why non-filmmakers should attend?
EK: Anyone who enjoys movies should come. Anyone who enjoys celebrating local talent should come. Anyone who believes in celebrating the kickass accomplishments of women should come.

Q: Tell me briefly about yourself and your film/project.
EK: I am a women, I am from Colorado and I am a filmmaker, but I’m sure you already gathered that 🙂 The Old Man was shot in Boulder in fall of last year and this will be the second festival screening. This was one of the easiest and natural film project that I have done, everything pretty seamlessly came together. The story also felt really important to tell right now.

Q: Is there anything you’d like to say about Colorado Independent Women of Film?
EK: I’m so glad you are here, celebrating Colorado women in film. I am honored to be part of the festival.

The Old Man will screen Saturday, June 4th at 8:00 p.m. at The Bug Theatre.